SDRV and Homebase sign-on Errors

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Here are some typical errors that may be encountered when trying to log into TAM, and suggested fixes ("J" here is your Applied drive):


Sign On Errors

  1. When trying to log into TAM: “an error was detected during system start-up program and must be corrected before continuing”. Delete lock file STARTUP.ERR in J:\TAM_EXE. Caused by for example TAMSTART.exe if it finds an error in the databases (whether that error is significant or not).
  2. “Could not read header of DAILY.DBF” 2147762181. Cleared by trying again. Cause not known. Also, if user cancels log in process, it seems to take system up to 30 seconds to “reset” itself, and trying to log on before that gives this error.
  3. Lock in place – delete lock file GLOBAL.LOK from AS_LOCK folder (assuming of course that this is not in place for a specific reason e.g. databases being re-indexed).
  4. “Cannot open or create "J:\TAM_EXE\INITIAL.TBL": Error 32: The process cannot access the file because it is being used by another process”. Trying to change system date via log on screen. Indicated somebody using the system, just needed to wait to clear, then try again.
  5. “An error occurred running TAM Home Base, WaitForSingleObject failed, local version of TAM does not match the network files. Run ASUPDATE to repair.” May be due to missing wintam.ini file.
  6. DEMO version – 2147762181. Could not open DAILY.DBF from "J:\DEMOTAM\DAILY.DBF" for reading. Trying to open Demo data. DEMOTAM folder missing.
  7. Could not open DAILY.DBF (live system) – check file path showing in error message, then check this against path shown in Initial.TBL file (TAM_EXE folder)
  8. “Unable to store value ASMITH for entry “XX” in section “ENV” of the file C:\WINTAM\WINTAM.INI”, where ASMITH is current user name. 2147762181. This is where the Wintam.ini file has been copied from another user (“XX”), and new user does not have rights to edit it – Domain user needs to be member of Local Admins group. Log into PC as administrator, go to Computer Management via My Computer, then Local Users & Groups, Administrators, then add Domain User here. Alternatively, ensure adequate rights have been granted to users on the Applied network drive.
  9. Error 429 – runtime error, ActiveX component can't create object. Could be a permissions issue as for item 8. Also check that the Applied drive is mapped and visible.
  10. Program hangs at the “Updating Mailbox” stage (versions before 10). In the absence of email problems, try restarting PC – use task manager to close Homebase.
  11. "Entry Key Must Not Be Empty" - Check WINTAM.INI for any lines beginning with = sign, or any non-valid text below the [network] section – delete these and try again.


You may also get “Invalid sign on” message, suggesting incorrect password. Look at Task Manager in case more than one Homebase.exe is running, and a rundll32 process. Close all these (assuming they are not related to other applications). One time we had a conflict with MS Word, and it was winword.exe that was stopping the log in process, even though Word was closed.


SDRV Error

May be linked to defective wintam.ini file. Try running J:\wintam\tamini.exe, and/or tamini.exe /r (but note this will wipe all settings back to defaults, and for UK users, may remove UK settings from the INI file). Also you can copy components from a valid INI file into defective one or rename the WINTAM.ctx file as .ini. You would then need to change obvious things in the text file like user name, who to follow up code, and delete station i.d. Also delete all 4 lines under network section to avoid Station Lock errors (duplicate node). Make sure text file has TamShell, Components and Components32 details all present.


If you think that the WINTAM.ini file appears to be OK, it could be a problem with Active Directory profile – check on Exchange server (if you use it) that Terminal Services Profile has an entry in, so user can “see” folder where the INI file is stored. Profile tab – connect Home to User drive.

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